Latest News
Ambulance Service is Saving More Lives
Friday 28 August 2015
658 out of hospital cardiac arrest lives saved

The Scottish Ambulance Service is saving more lives by developing clinical skills and treatment, refining triage and enhancing integrated care pathways.

Speaking at the Service’s Annual Public Review today, David Garbutt, Chairman of the Scottish Ambulance Service said:
...

read more

Latest News
Nominate Your Ambulance Hero
Tuesday 18 August 2015

Members of the public are being asked to take part in the Scottish Ambulance Service annual staff and volunteer recognition awards by nominating anyone that they think deserves recognition for their commitment to patient care.

The awards recognise the high levels of dedication and professionalism shown by Service staff and volunteers....

read more

Latest News
Annual Review
Friday 24 July 2015
This year the Scottish Ambulance service Annual Review will be held on 28 August at the Beardmore Hotel and Conference Centre, Clydebank, Glasgow.  We welcome members of the public, patients and their carers to attend and hear discussion from the Service on its performance over the last year.

Find out more
Latest News
New Air Ambulance Helicopters will Enhance Patient Care
Friday 26 June 2015

The Scottish Ambulance Service will operate one of the most advanced publicly funded air ambulance services in the world after taking delivery of two new purpose built helicopters that are due to replace existing aircraft next month.

The two new Airbus H145 aircraft will replace the current EC135 helicopters which have been in service sin...

read more

 
Calling 999
 

When to call 999

You should always call 999 if someone is seriously injured or their life is at risk

Some examples of medical emergencies include:

  • chest pain;
  • breathing difficulty;
  • unconsciousness;
  • severe loss of blood;
  • severe burns or scalds;
  • fitting or concussion;
  • drowning;
  • severe allergic reactions;
  • choking;
  • a child with sudden unexpected symptoms.

If it is not a life threatening of serious emergency you should consider other options before dialling 999.
These could include:

[-] hide
 

When you call us

When you call 999 an operator will ask which emergency service you need. If it’s a medical emergency, ask for the ambulance service and you will be put through to one of our call takers.

What information will I need?

You will be asked to provide the following information:

  • the address where you are, including postcode, if possible;
  • the phone number that you are calling from;
  • what has happened.

As soon as we know where you are, help will be on its way to you.

You will also be asked to give some additional information such as:

  • the patient’s age, sex and medical history;
  • whether the patient is conscious, breathing and if there is any bleeding or chest pain;
  • details of the injury and how it happened.

Answering these questions does not delay the response, but helps us to give you important first aid advice while the ambulance is on its way.

The extra information also helps to make sure that we send the most appropriate help to you.

What can I do before help arrives?

Before the ambulance arrives, you can help us by doing the following:

  • if you are outside, stay with the patient until help arrives;
  • call us back if the patient’s condition worsens;
  • call us again if your location changes;
  • if you are calling from home or work, ask someone to open the doors and signal to ambulance staff where they are needed;
  • lock away any family pets;
  • if you can, write down the patient’s GP details and collect any medication that they are taking;
  • tell us if the patient has any allergies;
  • stay calm – our staff are there to help. Violence or threatening behaviour will not be tolerated and could delay getting help to the patient.

How can I be prepared for an emergency?

There are things that you can do today to help us in the future:

  • check that your house number can be seen from the road;
  • if you live on an estate, check that there is a clear sign to direct emergency services and that the lifts are working.
[-] hide

Who will treat you

As soon as we have enough information and we believe you need immediate medical treatment, we will send help.

There are a number of ways in which we respond, depending on the circumstances:

Emergency Ambulance

Frontline emergency ambulances with a crew of two, one of which will be a paramedic, respond to the majority of emergency calls. Ambulance Technicians and Paramedics are trained to deal with life threatening illnesses and injuries. We carry a full range of medical equipment on our ambulances, including electrocardiogram (ECG) machines to monitor a patient’s heart and defibrillators which can restart the heart if a patient goes into cardiac arrest.

Paramedic Response Unit (PRU)

Paramedic Response Units are normally crewed by a paramedic working on their own. They will go to patients by car or motorcycle and carry all of the life saving equipment needed in a medical emergency. In life threatening situations, they can provide a vital, fast response and they will be backed up by an emergency ambulance that can take you to hospital.

Special Operations Team (SORT)

Specialised Paramedics, Technicians and Logistics Staff trained to gain access and administer care for patients in hazardous or difficult environments and at the scene of major incidents. SORT also deploy to provide paramedical support for other agencies involved in potentially hazardous environments.

Community Paramedics

These are paramedics who have undertaken extra clinical training. They are able to thoroughly investigate a patient’s condition and situation and then make a qualified decision about the best way to progress their treatment. They often work with minor injuries units and out of hours doctor services and can refer patients to the most appropriate care if a visit to hospital is not required.

Air Ambulance

We operate two emergency helicopters and two fixed wing planes. They are often asked to assist at incidents where there may problems with inaccessible terrain or where a very fast evacuation to hospital is preferable to a journey by road ambulance.

Community First Responders

These are members of the community who have been trained to provide first aid and other medical skills while the ambulance is on its way to you. They are able to deliver treatments that are time critical, such as using a shock box in cardiac cases.

BASICS Scotland Responders (British Association of Immediate Care)

BASICS Responders are Doctor's, Nurses and Paramedics who have received additional Pre-Hospital Emergency Training through BASICS Scotland. Each of the Responders are provided with a Sandpiper Medical/Trauma Response bag and access to a Defibrillator. Many Responders have also been issued with an Ambulance Service Airwave Radio and a Vehicle Locater System to allow contact and best resourcing via their Emergency Medical Dispatch Centre.

Paramedic Clinical Advisor

If the incident is not life threatening, you may be passed by telephone to one of our Paramedic Clinical Advisors, or to NHS 24, who will give you assistance or point you in the right direction for help.

Whatever your reason for calling us, the Emergency Medical Call Taker who answers your call will ensure that you receive the most appropriate response and liaise with other services and professionals where necessary.

[-] hide
Open Day
Open Day
Patient Engagement
Patient Engagement
Become a volunteer!
Become a volunteer ad campaign!
 

Patient Opinion

An independent site about your experiences of UK health services, good or bad. We pass your stories to the right people to make a difference.
Learn more
 

We value your feedback

Do you have a compliment, concern, comment or complaint about us? Find out the different ways you can let us have your feedback.
Learn more